Global Educators Cohort Program - Teacher Education

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Korean:

You are the 60 year old manager of a US company's Korean office. A young executive has come from America to change the way you run your office. You're not sure that he is qualified to make any suggestions since he looks so young; you must have much more experience than he does. You also want to know how much money he makes to see if the US headquarters is treating Korean employees fairly. He refuses to answer your questions so you need to use the 4 steps to find out why.
  • 1. Both people explain what they find unusual about the other's behavior.
  • 2. Each person realizes the other's cultural perceptions.
  • 3. Each person learns how the problem would be handled in the other's culture.
  • 4. Together, the two people develop conflict solutions.

American:

You are an American business person visiting your company's Korean office. After an unusual dinner the night before, you're looking forward to seeing how things work in the Korean office. The manager of the office greets you and announces that he will be showing you around today.

He says that you look younger than he expected and asks your age. You would rather not say. Then he asks if you make a lot of money. You are not comfortable with these questions so use the 4 steps to solve this problem.
  • 1. Both people explain what they find unusual about the other's behavior.
  • 2. Each person realizes the other's cultural perceptions.
  • 3. Each person learns how the problem would be handled in the other's culture.
  • 4. Together, the two people develop conflict solutions.



This conversation between two students is an example of an assessment for extensive speaking. It could be used as a summative formal exam at the end of a unit or it could be used more informally as a formative assessment. The students have prompts, yet the answers can be extremely varied. Overall, the assessment is moderately practical. Teachers can assess two students at the same time, but do to time, it would not be very practical if it was used for a large class. As long as the teacher has a time limit and evaluation procedure mapped out, this test could be pretty practical. The assessment seems moderately reliable. The students will be doing the same thing and producing speech that is similar (at least on the same topic). One thing that brings down the reliability of the assessment is the bias towards American and Korean culture. The prompt does not give much information on what the other person did differently so some students would not be able to do the assessment without prior information given. The assessment can be valid as long as the teacher has specific objectives they are looking to meet. Some objectives that could be set are for being able to express points and opinions or pronunciation. Without a specific goal in mind, the assessment loses validity, because if you do not know what is to be tested, how can a teacher test it. The authenticity for the assessment is pretty high since the students are able to create their own answers and the situation can be very likely in a professional context. The possibilities for wash back seem to be endless, but they rely on the criteria that is chosen for the objectives of the assessment and the grading scale chosen by the teacher. The teacher can provide feedback on the objectives they were looking for and the major mistakes the students made but the practicality is lowered as it takes more time and effort but the wash back is beneficial for the students. If the teacher chooses a holistic scoring, then the student does not get much, if not any, positive feedback. One way the student can get positive wash back without raising the practicality is giving individual grade to the different parts of the assessment (ideas, pronunciation, correctness, etc.) so that the student knows what areas they need to improve. K.Z.
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